Mission, Vision & Covenant

One of the responsibilities of the Board of Trustees is to envision the future of the church and set its goals. These goals come from the congregation's core values. At workshops in 2015, groups of members of this church met to define the core values. From the core values comes the mission of the church and the goals of the church (Ends). The Ends are the direction to our Senior Minister, and he/she is charged with achieving them. The Board sets limits on the Senior Minister through formal Executive Limitations. As the church changes, those core values, mission, and ends should be regularly reviewed and revised. The Board held a retreat Oct 19, 2015, and used the material gathered at the congregational workshop to identify these:

UCH Core Values
  • Loving-Kindness
  • Connection
  • Transformation
  • Joy
UCH Mission Statement

"Build Bridges, Celebrate Community"

UCH Ends Statements

WITHIN: Individuals associated with the Unitarian Church of Harrisburg joyfully discover the power within that connects us to the whole of life

AMONG: Individuals associated with the Unitarian Church of Harrisburg connect to a safe, diverse, respectful and loving community

BEYOND: The Unitarian Church of Harrisburg lives its Unitarian Universalist values and transforms the world outside its walls

Covenant

The Unitarian Church of Harrisburg is associated with The Unitarian Universalist Association. While there is no formal creed, there is a covenant that we ascribe to.

We, the member congregations of The Unitarian Universalist Association, covenant to affirm and promote:

  • The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
  • Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations;
  • Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
  • A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
  • The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;
  • The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all;
  • Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

(These are also known as the Seven Principles)

The living tradition which we share draws from many sources:

  • Direct experience of that transcending mystery and wonder,
  • affirmed in all cultures, which moves us to a renewal of the spirit and an openness to the forces that create and uphold life;
  • Words and deeds of prophetic women and men which challenge us to confront powers and structures of evil with justice, compassion, and the transforming power of love;
  • Wisdom from the world’s religions which inspires us in our ethical and spiritual life; Jewish and Christian teachings which call us to respond to God’s love by loving our neighbors as ourselves;
  • Humanist teachings which counsel us to heed the guidance of reason and the results of science, and warn us against idolatries of the mind and spirit.
  • Grateful for the religious pluralism which enriches and ennobles our faith, we are inspired to deepen our understanding and expand our vision.